Dayahatyn

Dayahatyn

Dayahatyn (also spelled Dayakhatyn or Daya-khatyn or Bai Khatyn in folk) is a medieval caravanserai, sitting on the left bank of Amu Darya. It is around 170 km to the northwest of the modern city of Turkmenabat, Lebap Wilayah, near the border between Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan. It is a fortified square enclosure with sides of 53 metres long. It was originally a fortress built by Tahir ibn Husayn in the 9th century. In the 11th century, it was transformed into a caravanserai with fascinating brick-structures, providing shelter for not only caravans but also elites during their long journeys. The integrity of Dayahatyn acts as a typical example showing the mastering skill of Seljuk architects on brickworks during the 11th and 12th centuries. Because of its artistic excellence, Dayahatyn is regarded as one of the most valuable and the finest example of caravanserai structure extant in the Central Asia.

At its highest, there were thousands of different caravanserais scattered along the Silk Road. However, most of them have been completely demolished and only the masterpieces, like Dayahatyn, are left along the Silk Road. Its artistic excellence makes Dayahatyn the most fascinating caravanserai in Turkmenistan. It represents the gorgeous brickwork of the 11th century. It is also one of the most remarkable example of caravanserai architecture in Central Asia, along with Rabat-i Malik and Rabat-i Sharaf. These three caravanserais, with extraordinary artistic fineness, are believed to be the luxurious hotels along the Silk Road at that time.  Among them, Dayahatyn retained its general contours to this day and has the highest integrity. As the structural layout is simply symmetrical, the missing parts of the buildings and decorations could be restored easily without any speculation based on the existing remains. The complete structure of caravanserai could always be easily recreated.[3] Because of its architectural excellence and importance, Dayahatyn caravanserai is included in “The Analytic and Systematic Regional Inventory of Caravanserais in Central Asia”, organised by National Commission for UNESCO. Since 2002, Dayahatyn has been the subject of photographic surveys and drawing up of architectural documents.[6] Dayahatyn is also recommended for inclusion in the UNESCO World Heritage List because of its significance on the Silk Road

source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dayahatyn

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